August 26, 2015

Why We Need to Get All Chickens Off All Drugs

Meeri Kim

Meeri Kim

Freelance Journalist

Philadelphia

Chicken-pill-Alexander-Winch-2015We’re almost getting used to it by now: chicken producers and restaurant chains are flocking to get antibiotics out of their food chains. A rash of large food corporations have been announcing their plans to cut the use of human antibiotics in their chickens. Major headlines in the last year include: “McDonald’s Moving to Limit Antibiotic Use in Chickens,” “Perdue Says Its Hatching Chicks Are Off Antibiotics,” “Tyson: Nix Human Antibiotics in Chickens by 2017.”

And it’s a good thing, too: the misuse of antibiotics is of major concern in the ever-escalating problem of antibiotic resistance. Read More >

August 21, 2015

CLF Week in Links: Pumpkins, Farm Data, CNN and more

Robert Lawrence, MD

Robert Lawrence, MD

Director

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Saying "no" to caramel coloring.

Saying “no” to caramel coloring.

Good news for school lunches. I’ll start off this week’s update with some good news, coming from Marin County, California. Starting this month, the Sausalito Marin City School District will be serving 100 percent organic, GMO-free meals in two schools in Marin City and Sausalito. These schools serve about 500 students. All meals will be prepared on-site by The Conscious Kitchen, which rethinks school food based on five foundational terms: Fresh, Local, Organic, Seasonal and Non-GMO. This is the first school district in the nation to deliver food with this model. An important message to Big Ag is that transparency in labeling is essential for long-term monitoring of health and ecosystem effects of GMOs, and until we can have post-release surveillance and epidemiologic studies of possible health effects, the public will be attracted to approaches such as this one in Marin. Read More >

August 12, 2015

Cultivating Food Security in West Oakland

Cynthia McKelvey

Cynthia McKelvey

Freelance Journalist

Oakland, California

mcKelvey-cityslickers-3Take the seven-minute underground train ride from San Francisco to Oakland and you’ll emerge in West Oakland. The historically low-income neighborhood has a long record of industrial development and racial tension. Now it’s become the face of gentrification on the West Coast. But despite the influx of artists, coffee shops, and an ever-lengthening wait for soul-food brunch at Brown Sugar Kitchen, West Oakland is still lacking one major signifier of urban investment: a grocery store.

“We can say West Oakland is gentrifying but there’s still no grocery store here. Read More >

July 30, 2015

Foraging for Hidden Harvests

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Eric Kelly of Charm City Farms

Eric Kelly of Charm City Farms

Eric Kelly doesn’t really believe in weeds. Or rather, he’s got radically different ideas about weeds than most people. As far as he’s concerned, almost every plant has value, either as food or medicine, or because it’s doing some kind of work in the soil. Clover, for example, which some people make great efforts to eradicate from their lawns, does an excellent job fixing nitrogen in the soil. Symbiotic bacteria take up nitrogen from the air, transfer it to the roots, and then leave it in the soil to nourish other plants. The flower and the leaves of purple clover, says Eric, are medicinal, as well.

“A weed is any plant that grows in a place you don’t want it to,” he says. “The only plant I ever weed out is grass.”

Also known as the “Mangy White Bushman,” Eric teaches Baltimore denizens how to find food in unexpected places. Read More >

July 24, 2015

CLF Week in Links: Bird Flu Chaos, John Oliver and More

Robert Lawrence, MD

Robert Lawrence, MD

Director

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

crowdedpoultryfarm.pngBird flu H5N2 and USDA. The bird flu epidemic that has killed about 48 million turkeys and egg-laying hens is severe enough that the USDA has formed a special task force to prepare for the worsening of the flu in the fall. Part of the work of the task force involves strategizing how to dispose of the carcasses so that landfills are not overwhelmed or unnecessarily contaminated. The flu, known as H5N2, has poultry producers in the Midwest concerned and suffering economic loss; the price of eggs has risen as a result of the flu. On Wednesday, the AP reported Read More >

July 23, 2015

Where and Why to Buy Local in Maryland

Kathlee Freeman

Kathlee Freeman

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

buylocal-logoBuy Local Week is upon us! Kicking off with Governor Larry Hogan’s Buy Local Cookout on July 16, the challenge to “eat at least one thing from a local farm every day” has been lauded by farmers market organizations, civic groups, and locavores who view eating locally as a way to protect the environment, boost local businesses, and build community. After all, the typical American meal travels an astounding 1,500 miles before it winds up on someone’s plate.

With an estimated 12,000 farms throughout Maryland, and over 1,100 of those selling locally, the Buy Local campaign is a boon to thousands of farming families throughout the state. Read More >

July 14, 2015

How Free is Your Produce?

Kate McCleary

Kate McCleary

Senior Project Coordinator

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

free-produce-quakerYou know that feeling when a teacher asks the class, “Do you need me to explain? Raise your hand if you don’t know what ____ means.” You look around, not wanting to be the only person unfamiliar with the term. Well, a most unexpected thing happened at a conference recently: a panelist in a session on gastrodiplomacy began speaking about the “free produce movement,” and I was shocked to discover that apparently very few of us (if any) in a room full of experts in food studies had heard of it.

Michelle Branch, of New York University School of Law, was presenting her work, “Free Produce Societies as Agents of Diplomacy” at an annual conference that convenes thinking about food, society, and values, hosted by Chatham University. She explained that the free produce movement was an early food justice movement propelled by Quakers and Read More >

July 10, 2015

CLF Week in Links: Chesapeake Bay, GMOs, Iowa Water

Robert Lawrence, MD

Robert Lawrence, MD

Director

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

2015-can-labelFood labels. In their Ask Well blog, The New York Times addressed an issue that our own researcher Roni Neff has been tackling for some time: the confusion that surrounds food labels. All those “best by” and “sell by” dates may be contributing to unnecessary food waste, and misleading consumers. The Times story is here. For more on Roni’s research, read this story, published by Johns Hopkins Public Health magazine.

Good news for the Bay. This week, the U.S. Third Court of Appeals upheld a Chesapeake Read More >

July 9, 2015

Ruling in Support of EPA and Chesapeake Bay Cleanup

Claire Fitch

Claire Fitch

Program Officer, Food System Policy Program

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Downtown Annapolis and Spa Creek, leading into the Severn River and Chesapeake Bay.

Downtown Annapolis and Spa Creek, leading into the Severn River and Chesapeake Bay.

Five years ago, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) made a landmark decision to foster the cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay. The agency’s plan was the Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL), the goal of which was to identify and control major sources of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment in the seven Bay jurisdictions (six states and the District of Columbia) that comprise the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The TMDL effort calls for a 25 percent reduction in nitrogen, a 24 percent reduction in phosphorus, and a 20 percent reduction in sediment in the Bay Read More >

July 8, 2015

How the TPP Trade Deal Could Affect Food and Public Health

Krycia Cowling

Krycia Cowling

CLF-Lerner Fellow

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

2015-stop-TPPOne of the most famous—or infamous—Supreme Court rulings this century has been Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission in 2010. This “corporations are people” ruling granted U.S. corporations the same right to free speech as individuals, effectively removing previous restrictions on corporate campaign donations, a form of political speech. Read More >